Blog

Read our latest posts on a range of subjects related to restorative practice below. 

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Towards a renewed partnership? Reconsidering the role of religion in restorative justice

24 October 2017

This blog is the third of the RJC’s blog series highlighting how restorative practice connects with some of the big themes of the day. In this blog, Yutaka Osakabe, a PhD researcher at the University of Aberdeen, reflects on the long-disputed role of religion in restorative justice from his fieldwork.

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Racism in the playground: a restorative response

11 October 2017

This blog is the second of the RJC’s blog series highlighting how restorative practice connects with some of the big themes of the day. In this guest blog, Luke Roberts, restorative practitioner and managing director of Resolve, reflects on how restorative approaches can help staff to address racist incidents in schools.

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Restorative practice in schools: developing responsibility over conformity

Chris Straker
27 September 2017

The question of discipline in schools is in the media again. The focus point for the debate is a recently reopened academy in Great Yarmouth, which has introduced new behaviour guidelines to improve pupil performance. The leaked guidelines were viewed by some parents and commentators as ‘draconian’, and prompted several requests from parents to transfer children out of the school.

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Strengthening democracy through restorative practice – empathy, power and a sense of self

Chris Straker
14 September 2017

This blog is the first of a new RJC blog series highlighting how restorative practice connects with some of the big themes of the day. In this first blog of the series, the RJC’s interim chief executive, Chris Straker, reflects on the links between democracy and restorative practice.

Tomorrow is International Day of Democracy, with a theme of ‘democracy and conflict prevention’. This provides a perfect opportunity to reflect on the vital, but often overlooked, role of restorative practice in strengthening democratic involvement.

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Look for where the circles intersect - a comment on the Lammy Review

Chris Straker
8 September 2017

David Lammy’s review of the treatment of, and outcomes for, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) individuals in the criminal justice system was published today. Lammy raises important points on the disproportionality of BAME people within the criminal justice system. However, it is disappointing that restorative justice receives so little discussion within the review.

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Goodbye, and good luck

Jon Collins
31 July 2017

After more than three years, this will be my last blog post as chief executive of the RJC before I move on to pastures new. It has been an enormous privilege to work for the RJC and to work with and on behalf of our members, supporting them to deliver high quality restorative practice across England and Wales.

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What’s in the manifestos for restorative justice?

Jon Collins
22 May 2017

With the general election a little over two weeks away, campaigning is in full swing and the main three parties have published their manifestos.

As expected, crime and criminal justice have not been prominent in the campaign so far, with the exception of the fallout from Dianne Abbott’s excruciating interview on the cost of Labour’s pledge to recruit 10,000 more police officers. But all of the manifestos contain the obligatory sections on law and order, so what do they tell us about the prospects of restorative justice in the next parliament?

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Restorative justice and domestic violence – getting it right

Jon Collins
28 February 2017

Last week, Sam Gyimah – a minister at the Ministry of Justice – confirmed, in an answer to a parliamentary question tabled by Labour MP Christina Rees, that the government believes that ‘there can be a place for restorative justice in domestic abuse cases alongside prosecution’.

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Should there be a restorative response to sexual harassment?

Jon Collins
13 February 2017

Last week, following the Article 50 vote in the House of Commons, it was widely reported that the secretary of state for Brexit, David Davis, tried to kiss the shadow home secretary Diane Abbott, who had reluctantly supported the government’s Bill. In response, she reportedly told him to ‘fuck off’.

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Why stories matter

Jon Collins
16 January 2017

Last week, a Westminster Hall debate was held on the report of last year’s Justice Select Committee inquiry on restorative justice. For readers not familiar with the intricacies of parliamentary procedure, Westminster Hall debates provide an opportunity for MPs to debate an issue and get a response from a government minister. While they may not directly lead to change, they do provide an update on the government’s views.

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