CPD and reflective practice log examples

Example of learning from a Continuing Professional Development training course

Date                      10 July 2014

Activity

I attended a one day training course on ‘How to make restorative practice more inclusive’ which was delivered by a Facilitator.

Learning

This course emphasised that many people are excluded from taking part in a restorative process because of their individual needs. It explored what we see as facilitators as the ‘perfect victim’ and ‘perfect offender’. I learnt that I need to look at how I can tailor my practice to include potential participants who do not fit into these categories. I also learnt new strategies for overcoming specific learning difficulties and language and communication barriers. These techniques can be used in preparing participants for a restorative process and in face-to-face meetings.

How the learning has made a difference to my practice

The training has made me think about how I can make restorative approaches available to a wider audience by either making appropriate adjustments or by being creative to meet individual needs. I am now more able to adapt my approach. During August 2014 I was working with a young person with a communication difficulty. My colleagues felt that she would not be able to engage in a restorative process and if she did this might have a negative impact on the victim. Following my training, I felt confident to challenge this and assessed that a process could go ahead with robust planning and preparation. I took the time to understand the needs of the young person. This lead me to adapt my practice – rather than relying on spoken language, in the preparation phase the young person told me what happened through her drawings. This did mean that the restorative process took longer than usual but my approach meant that both the young person and the victim could take part in a restorative process when otherwise this would not have happened.

Example of learning from working a restorative case

Date                      June – August 2014

Activity

The facilitation of a restorative process with a face-to-face meeting when one of the participants had a communication difficulty.

Learning

My learning from this case was that the restorative processes may take longer than when there are no such difficulties, particularly in the preparation phase. For example, I will need extra time to understand more about the particular needs of the participant, to make sure the participant feels comfortable in how their needs are being addressed and to make any adjustments to the process. In this particular case I initially relied on spoken language to communicate with the participant but I was not able to obtain the information I needed to assess the risks and benefits of facilitating a restorative process.

How the learning has made a difference to my practice

I recently worked a case where one of the participants was profoundly deaf and had autism. My experience of working the previous case meant that I could plan for an extensive preparation phase before a face-to-face meeting. I also had to work with an interpreter. Through taking the time to understand the young person’s needs I could structure the restorative process effectively to engage the young person and to use visual means such as drawing timelines of events rather than the spoken word. The participant’s anxieties around times and dates of meetings and the sequencing of events could then be managed.